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The College Hour is doing something different. We are not going to put HBCU's by states, region or in alphabetical order. We are hoping that you stretch your mind and look at a lot these institutions because they all have a lot to offer. Choosing an institution is a very important decision and shouldn't be taken lightly. The majority of students and parents choose a school a lot of times because of financial reasons. Some choose because we don't want to be far from home. I hope you take this thought into consideration. Choose a school on the strength of it's ability to get you where you want to go in life. I say this because there is a prevailing thought that the ice is colder from someone else's refrigerator. This fallacy is further from the truth than people realize. Statistics show from the 2010 Department of Education that over 40 % of African Americans that received Bachelor Degrees came from HBCUs. Over 70% of African American Doctors and Dentist come from HBCU's. Over 50% of African American Engineers come from HBCUs. Now take this thought with you. HBCUs only make up only 3% of Colleges and Universities in this country. These institutions also have close ties to corporations and foundations for employment and for raising capital for their endowment and working capital. HBCUs give a sense of belonging, self pride and the thought of experimenting and failure is just a learning experience of something not to do again and try another approach to get the answer. The College Hour recognizes that HBCU's are not for everyone. If you are thinking about going to College, GO TO COLLEGE. It is one of the greatest experience that you will have in your life.

But, if you decide to go to college, go to a HBCU!!!!!


   Tennesse_State_University_Seal   Tennesse_State_University_Tiger_Mascot

Tennesse State University

In 1909, the Tennessee State General Assembly created three normal schools, including the Agricultural and Industrial Normal School, which would grow to become TSU. The first 247 students began their academic careers on June 19, 1912, and William Jasper Hale served as head of the school. Students, faculty, and staff worked together as a family to keep the institution operating, whether the activity demanded clearing rocks, harvesting crops, or carrying chairs from class to class.

The school gained the capacity to grant bachelor’s degrees in 1922, reflecting its new status as a four-year teachers’ college. By 1924, the college became known as the Agricultural and Industrial State Normal College and the first degrees were awarded. In 1927, “Normal” was dropped from the name. Throughout the 1920s and 1930s, the college grew in scope and stature under the charge “Enter to learn; go forth to serve.”

When President Hale retired in 1943 after more than 30 years of service, one of the institution’s growing roster of impressive alumni, Walter S. Davis, was selected as his successor. Until his retirement in 1968, Davis led the college through an era of tremendous growth in academics and facilities that led to worldwide recognition.

The Tennessee General Assembly of 1941 authorized a substantial upgrade to the educational program of the college. Graduate studies leading to the master’s degree, initially offered in several branches of teacher education, were established. The first master’s degrees were awarded in June 1944.

The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools granted accreditation to TSU in 1946. In August 1951, the Tennessee State Board of Education approved university status. The resulting reorganization of the institution’s educational program created the Graduate School, the School of Arts & Sciences, the School of Education, and the School of Engineering. Provisions were also made for the later addition of other schools in agriculture, business, and home economics.

Under the name Tennessee Agricultural & Industrial State University, the institution achieved full land-grant university status in August 1958. The Land-Grant University Program included the School of Agriculture & Home Economics, the Graduate School, the Division of Extension and Continuing Education, and the Department of Aerospace Studies. The School of Allied Health Professions and the School of Business were created in 1974, and the School of Nursing was established in 1979.

After Walter Davis retired as president in 1968, another TSU alumnus, Andrew Torrence, was named the University’s third president. During his relatively brief tenure, the state legislature dropped “Agricultural & Industrial” and officially changed the name to Tennessee State University.

When Frederick Humphries became TSU’s president in 1975, Nashville was also home to a second public four-year university. The Knoxville-based University of Tennessee began offering extension credit in Nashville in 1947 and expanded its programs throughout the 1960s. By 1971, it was accredited as a degree-granting institution that occupied new quarters at the corner of Tenth and Charlotte Avenues. But in 1968, TSU faculty member Rita Sanders filed a lawsuit, which became known as Geier v. Tennessee, alleging a dual system of higher education in Tennessee based on race. On July 1, 1979, the case was settled by a court order merging the former University of Tennessee at Nashville with TSU. As president, Humphries was the first to face the challenge of maintaining the balance between TSU’s role as one of America’s preeminent historically black universities and its emerging status as a comprehensive national university.

The university continued to improve the campus and buildings from state funds and donations. Tenneessee State University is known for it engineering and science departments. This is a great institution and has a reach history in academics and in sports, from Olympic Gold medal winners to professional athletes. This is a must see university.

Academia:                                                                                                             Athletics
College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences                        Men's Sports                  Women's Sports
College of Business                                                                           Basketball                       Basketball
College of Education                                                                        Cross Country                 Cross Country
College of Engineering                                                                      Football                          Volleyball
Graduate Studies & Research                                                            Golf                                Golf
College of Health Sciences                                                                 Tennis                             Tennis
College of Liberal Arts                                                                      Track and Field               Track and Field
College of Public Service and Urban Affairs                                                                              Softball

TSU Home Page Link Below:
TSU Home Page

Tennessee State University
3500 John A Merritt Blvd
Nashville, Tennessee 37209
(615) 963-5000

TSU Admission Link Below:

Office of Admissions
Tennessee State University
3500 John A. Merritt Blvd
Nashville, TN 37209

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